Project Management Adrienne Watt

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Project Management
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pmawPeople have been undertaking projects since the earliest days of organized human activity. The hunting parties of our prehistoric ancestors were projects. Large complex projects such as the pyramids and the Great Wall of China were also projects.

Even something as simple as creating a dinner is considered a project. We use the term ?project? frequently in our daily conversations. This book covers the basics of project management. This includes the process of initiation, planning, execution, control, and closeout that all projects share.

It is possible to say that the concept of project management has been around since the beginning of history. It has enabled leaders to plan bold and massive projects and manage funding, materials, and labor within a designated time frame.

The project manager and project team have one shared goal: to carry out the work of the project for the purpose of meeting the project?s objectives. Every project has a beginning, a middle period during which activities move the project toward completion, and an ending (either successful or unsuccessful). A standard project typically has the following four major phases (each with its own agenda of tasks and issues): initiation, planning, implementation, and closure. Taken together, these phases represent the path a project takes from the beginning to its end and are generally referred to as the project ?life cycle.?

About the Author

Adrienne Watt holds a Computer Systems Diploma (BCIT), a Bachelors in Technology (BCIT) and a Master?s in Business Administration (City University). Since 1989, Adrienne has worked as an educator and gained extensive experience developing and delivering business and technology curriculum to post-secondary students. During that time she ran a successful software development business. In the business she worked as an IT Professional in a variety of senior positions including Project Manager, Database Designer, Administrator and Business Analyst. Recently she has been exploring a wide range of technology related tools and processes to improve delivery methods and enhance learning for her students.

The primary purpose of this course is to provide an open source course that covers most project management . The material in the course was obtained from a variety of sources. All the sources are found in the reference section at the end of each chapter.

Modules


Lessons

1. Project Management: Past and Present

Careers Using Project Management Skills Skills learned by your exposure to studying project management can be used in most careers as well as in your daily life. Strong planning skills, good communication, ability to implement a project to deliver the product or service while also monitoring for risks and managing the resources will provide an [...]

2. Project Management Overview

The starting point in discussing how projects should be properly managed is to first understand what a project is and, just as importantly, what it is not. People have been undertaking projects since the earliest days of organized human activity. The hunting parties of our prehistoric ancestors were projects, for example; they were temporary undertakings [...]

3. The Project Life Cycle (Phases)

The project manager and project team have one shared goal: to carry out the work of the project for the purpose of meeting the project?s objectives. Every project has a beginning, a middle period during which activities move the project toward completion, and an ending (either successful or unsuccessful). A standard project typically has the [...]

4. Framework for Project Management

Many different professions contribute to the theory and practice of project management. Engineers and architects have been managing major projects since pre-history. Since approximately the 1960s, there have?been efforts to professionalize the practice of project management as a specialization of its own. There are many active debates around this: Should project management be a profession [...]

5. Stakeholder Management

A project is successful when it achieves its objectives and meets or exceeds the expectations of the stake?holders. But who are the stakeholders? Stakeholders are individuals who either care about or have a vested interest in your project. They are the people who are actively involved with the work of the project or have something [...]

6. Culture and Project Management

What Is Organizational Culture? When working with internal and external customers on a project, it is essential to pay close attention to relationships, context, history, and the corporate culture. Corporate culture refers to the beliefs, attitudes, and values that the organization?s members share and the behaviors consistent with them (which they give rise to). Corporate [...]

7. Project Initiation

The project initiation phase is the first phase within the project management life cycle, as it involves starting up a new project. Within the initiation phase, the business problem or opportunity is identified, a solution is defined, a project is formed, and a project team is appointed to build and deliver the solution to the [...]

8. Overview of Project Planning

After the project has been defined and the project team has been appointed, you are ready to enter the second phase in the project management life cycle: the detailed project planning phase. Project planning is at the heart of the project life cycle, and tells everyone involved where you?re going and how you?re going to [...]

9. Scope Planning

You always want to know exactly what work has to be done before you start it. You have a collection of team members, and you need to know exactly what they?re going to do to meet the project?s objectives. The scope planning process is the very first thing you do to manage your scope. Project [...]

10. Project Schedule Planning

In order to develop our schedule, we first need to define the activities, sequence them in the right order, estimate the resources needed, and estimate the time it will take to complete the tasks. Defining Activities The activity definition process is a further breakdown of the work package elements of the WBS. It docu?ments the [...]

11. Resource Planning

In the previous wedding case study, it is clear that Steve and Susan have resource problems. Getting a handle on all of the tasks that have to be done is a great start, but it?s not enough to know the tasks and the order they come in. Before you can put the final schedule together, [...]

12. Budget Planning

Every project boils down to money. If you had a bigger budget, you could probably get more people to do your project more quickly and deliver more. That?s why no project plan is complete until you come up with a budget. But no matter whether your project is big or small, and no matter how [...]

13. Procurement Management

Procurement management follows a logical order. First, you plan what you need to contract; then you plan how you?ll do it. Next, you send out your contract requirements to sellers. They bid for the chance to work with you. You pick the best one, and then you sign the contract with them. Once the work [...]

14. Quality Planning

It?s not enough to make sure you get a project done on time and under budget. You need to be sure you make the right product to suit your stakeholders? needs. Quality means making sure that you build what you said you would and that you do it as efficiently as you can. And that [...]

(Indonesia) 15. Communication Planning

Communications management is about keeping everybody in the loop. The communications planning process concerns defining the types of information you will deliver, who will receive it, the format for communicating it, and the timing of its release and distribution. It turns out that 90% of a project manager?s job is spent on communication so it?s [...]

16. Risk Management Planning

Even the most carefully planned project can run into trouble. No matter how well you plan, your project can always encounter unexpected problems. Team members get sick or quit, resources that you were depending on turn out to be unavailable, even the weather can throw you for a loop (e.g., a snowstorm). So does that [...]

17. Project Implementation Overview

After you have carefully planned your project, you will be ready to start the project implementation phase, the third phase of the project management life cycle. The implementation phase involves putting the project plan into action. It?s here that the project manager will coordinate and direct project resources to meet the objectives of the project [...]

18. Project Completion

Every project needs to end and that?s what project completion is all about in the last phase of the project life cycle. The whole point of the project is to deliver what you promised. By delivering everything you said you would, you make sure that all stakeholders are satisfied and all acceptance criteria have been [...]

19. Celebrate!

The project team should celebrate their accomplishments, and the project manager should officially recognize their efforts, thank them for their participation, and officially close the project. A celebration helps team members formally recognize the project?s end and brings closure to the work they?ve done. It also encourages them to remember what they?ve learned and start [...]